Serium Senectutis

By Elias of Thriplow; Roger Hillas | Go to book overview

Commentary

For the sake of precision, I cite prose sources by both their place in the original text (book, chapter, section, or line) and their page and line location in the edition to which I refer. I have tried to distinguish between certain or near certain sources, on the one hand, and possible sources or analogues, on the other, by introducing all references to the latter by “cf.” Abbreviated titles for books of the Bible are those used by Robert Weber et al. in their edition of the Vulgate. This commentary also employs the following abbreviations:

BeiträgeBeiträge zur Geschichte der Philosophic des Mittelalters
CLclassical Latin
CSELCorpus scriptorum ecclesiasticorum Latinorum
MLDDictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources
OLDOxford Latin Dictionary
TLLThesaurus linguae Latinae

Full publication data for works cited here are available in the bibliography.


Book One

1–28 This poem on the marriages of the gods is inspired by the invocation of Hymen with which Martianus Capella begins his De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii 1.1 (ed. Willis 1.4ff). For surveys of Martianus’s influence, see C. Leonardi, “Nota introduttiva per un’indagine sulla fortuna di Marziano Capella nel Medievo,” and Gabriel Nuchelmans, “Philologia et son mariage avec Mercure jusq’à la fin du xiie siècle.” Willis provides extensive bibliography in his Teubner edition (Leipzig, 1983). Books 1 and 2 often circulated apart from the rest of the work in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries; see Leonardi, “I codici di Marziano Capella.” Elias also imitates Martianus by continuing his sense units from pentameter to hexameter in violation of the classical norm for elegiac verse.

2felici federe: Cf. Catullus, Carmina (ed. Mynors) 64.373.

4–9 Elias echoes Martianus 1.3 (2.17ff.).

4verata: Such a word is attested by Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 18.2.12 (ed. Marshall, 540.24–26): “Secundum ea hoc quaesitum est, uerbum ‘uerant,’ quod significat ‘uera dicunt,’ quisnam poetarum ueterum dixerit.” But it is inconceivable that a grammarian would scan věrǎtā. Verita would fit the meter but does not yield an acceptable sense unless Elias means the perfect to have a passive sense. The translation assumes such a sense, equivalent to that of verenda, “to be held in awe or reverence.”

6 The Abderite and Coan are Vulcan and Venus respectively.

7 For Argiona (“the Argive”), cf. Martianus 1.4 (3.11).

11–12 For Admetus and Alcestis, see below 1.89–93.

13ceteris cupido: The classical idiom would be better served by emending to ceteri, but the dative shows signs of encroaching on the genitive elsewhere in

-227-

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Serium Senectutis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Parentibus Optimis vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Conspectus Siglorum 47
  • Helie Rubei Tripolawensis Serium Senectutis1 48
  • Book Two 57
  • Book Three 75
  • Book Four 119
  • Book Five 147
  • Book Six 151
  • Book Seven 155
  • Book Eight 163
  • Book Nine 173
  • Book Ten 181
  • Book Eleven 197
  • Book Twelve 211
  • Book Thirteen 217
  • Commentary 227
  • Appendices 247
  • Bibliography 257
  • Indices *
  • Index Verborum 273
  • Index Auctorum 293
  • Index Nominum et Rerum 295
  • Mrts 303
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