Serium Senectutis

By Elias of Thriplow; Roger Hillas | Go to book overview

Index verborum

This index lists all post-classical words or senses of words, along with rariora and technical terms of any provenance, appearing in the Serium senectutis. It treats as post-classical words or senses which do not appear in the Oxford Latin Dictionary (OLD), but for matters of documentation or interpretation, the OLD has been consulted in tandem with the Thesaurus linguae Latinae (TLL). The OLD, TLL and Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (MLD) have been consulted for every word they cover. However, only the OLD is complete. In the Thesaurus linguae Latinae, I have been able to consult volumes 1–9 and volume 10, part 1, fascicules 1–4, and part 2, fascicules 1–5 (A-M, O-pastor, porta-praepotens). In the Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources, I have been able to consult fascicules 1–4 (A-inconsonans).1

For all words outside the scope of the TLL and MLD as published to date, I have consulted Alexander Souter’s Glossary of Later Latin (S) and R. E. Latham’s Revised Medieval Latin Word-List from British Sources (L) respectively. These books supply reliable corpora of late and medieval Latin and are usefully related to the larger works they stand in for. Souter admits his debt to the Thesaurus linguae Latinae, to which he contributed material, in his preface, and the Revised Word-List was compiled from an earlier version of the data base now being used to write the MLD. However, readers should note a slight difference in my use of S and L. Because Souter carefully outlines the independent reading program which underlies his Glossary, I sometimes cite S when the TLL is silent; however, since the editors of the Medieval Latin Dictionary, beginning with Latham himself, have scrutinized anew all the material in the Word-List, I never cite L when MLD is silent.

For words and senses which do not appear in the OLD, TLL/S or MLD/L, I sometimes suggest analogues or probable sources. Normally, I do not cite senses not used by Elias, even when those senses are documented and the sense employed by Elias is not. However, I stretch this rule somewhat in the case of words having technical senses related to the trivium, where it seems likely that Elias’ usage might have been influenced or triggered by his knowledge of the technical term.

1I am grateful to D. R. Howlett, editor of the Dictionary of Medieval Latin, for collating this index against the contents of fascicule 4 in advance of publication.

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Serium Senectutis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Parentibus Optimis vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Conspectus Siglorum 47
  • Helie Rubei Tripolawensis Serium Senectutis1 48
  • Book Two 57
  • Book Three 75
  • Book Four 119
  • Book Five 147
  • Book Six 151
  • Book Seven 155
  • Book Eight 163
  • Book Nine 173
  • Book Ten 181
  • Book Eleven 197
  • Book Twelve 211
  • Book Thirteen 217
  • Commentary 227
  • Appendices 247
  • Bibliography 257
  • Indices *
  • Index Verborum 273
  • Index Auctorum 293
  • Index Nominum et Rerum 295
  • Mrts 303
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