Reading Biblical Narratives: Literary Criticism and the Hebrew Bible

By Yairah Amit; Yael Lotan | Go to book overview

One
The Power of Stories

A CONSIDERABLE PART OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE Consists of Stories. Those who love measurements tell us that stories occupy fully one-third of the Bible. These stories tell us about humanity’s early days, the place of Israel among the ancient Near Eastern peoples, and the history of the link between God and God’s people, from the days of the patriarchs to the fall of Jerusalem and the return to Zion, and a great deal more.

The Bible makes plain that it ascribes great importance to stories and their presentation as a means of persuasion. The Bible even includes stories in which one person succeeds in persuading another by means of a story. Such is the case for Judah, who must persuade his brother Joseph not to harm Benjamin, the youngest of his brothers. To do this, he tells Joseph, who is at this time the viceroy of Pharaoh, King of Egypt, the full story of his family. Indeed, after hearing this moving and effective tale, Joseph cannot hide his emotion any longer; he breaks down and reveals his identity to his brothers (Gen 44:18–45:2).

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading Biblical Narratives: Literary Criticism and the Hebrew Bible
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • One - The Power of Stories 1
  • Two - Story Scholars An J the Role of the Reader 10
  • Three - A Biblical Story Alongside Biblical Criticism 22
  • Four - Beginnings and Endings 33
  • Five - Plots, Structures, and Their Functions 46
  • Six - Creating Characters with Μinimal Means 69
  • Seven - Whom to Believe? 93
  • Eight - The Biblical Story and the Use of Time 103
  • Nine - Place, Story, and History 115
  • Ten - Inherent and Added Significance 126
  • Eleven - The Story and Its Context 138
  • Afterword 148
  • Abbreviations 150
  • Notes 152
  • Works - Cited 169
  • Index - Of Biblical References 181
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 193

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.