Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community: Power, Conflict, and Solidarity

By Gilda L. Ochoa | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
“Where the Past Meets the Future”:
Centering La Puente

They keep coming—two million illegal immigrants in Califor-
nia. The federal government won’t stop them at the border, yet
requires us to pay billions to take care of them.

LAURA ANGELICA SIMÓN, director of video Fear and
Learning at Hoover Elementary
, 1996

Television commercials endorsing California’s Proposition 187, dubbed the “Save Our State” (SOS) initiative, played frequently during the fall of 1994— the period in which I began to systematically interview La Puente residents and to attend community events. During this period California was experiencing the most severe economic crisis since the Great Depression, and Proposition 187 effectively diverted attention away from the nearly one million jobs that had been lost in the early 1990s (Alvarez and Butterfield 2000, 168). Designed to eliminate social services to undocumented immigrants, Proposition 187 was premised on the belief that immigrants were spreading diseases, draining social services, crowding schools, and stealing jobs. Mexican immigrants already in the United States and Mexican immigration became the targets of this proposition and scapegoats for the declining economy. Though Proposition 187 was approved by a majority of voters, 77 percent of voting Latinas/os opposed the proposition (Acuña 1996, 160). It was just one of several California propositions during the 1990s that directly impacted the Mexican-origin community.

On the heels of the SOS initiative, California voters approved the 1996 ballot initiative to eliminate affirmative action, Proposition 209. This proposition, named the California Civil Rights Initiative (CCRI), appropriated the language of the civil rights movements and Martin Luther King Jr. and advocated that people “be judged by the content of their character, not the color of their skin.” Proponents combined such color-evasive rhetoric with the dominant myth of meritocracy. They equated affirmative action with racial preferences for people of color and discrimination against White men. Seventy-six percent of Latina/o voters opposed Proposition 209 (Acuña 1998, 9).

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community: Power, Conflict, and Solidarity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.