Black-Brown Relations and Stereotypes

By Tatcho Mindiola; Yolanda Flores Niemann et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Areas of Disagreement

There is conflict and competition and fighting and all of that be-
cause we are all scrambling over each other trying to get some-
where.

THIRTY-FIVE-YEAR-OLD U.S.-BORN HISPANIC FEMALE

Blacks and Browns have to work on our differences and come
together to form a permanent and history-making coalition. We
have to talk about it, write about it, dream about it, and make it
happen, because if we don’t, the powers that be are going to keep
us divided and prevent us from realizing our common destinies
of justice and fairness.

TWENTY-SEVEN-YEAR-OLD AFRICAN AMERICAN MALE

Disagreements between ethnic groups in the United States are not unknown. There has been conflict between Scots and Irish and Germans and Italians and between Whites and most people of color. Disagreements also exist between Blacks and Jews, Asians and Blacks, and, as this chapter illustrates, between Hispanics and Blacks.

Our discussion in this chapter is drawn from the Black-Brown survey conducted in Houston in 1996 and from interviews carried out over the past ten years among African Americans and Hispanics in Houston. The interviews highlight some major findings of the survey and allow the participants to speak for themselves.

The rapid increase in the number of Hispanics in Houston creates the impression among many people, including African Americans, of being overwhelmed. Hispanics are now seen everywhere in the city, as workers, shoppers, and residents. Areas of the city that were predominantly White thirty years ago are now Hispanic enclaves.

Hispanics are significant contributors and competitors in the economy

-43-

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