Black-Brown Relations and Stereotypes

By Tatcho Mindiola; Yolanda Flores Niemann et al. | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abington v. Schempp, 96
abortion, 53–55, 65, 88
activism, 10
adoption, 98
affirmative action, 27; benefits of, for Hispanics in Houston, 118; as an issue that unites African Americans and Hispanics, 64, 109, 129; movements against, 40; 1997 referendum about, 106; reevaluation of, 49–50
Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), 80
Allen, O. F., 7
amnesty program (for undocumented immigrants), 63
apartheid, 8
Asians, 4, 8, 43, 132
Austin, Texas, 112
bilingual education, 15, 40, 53, 88, 115. See also Spanish language
Black/White binary, 37
Bottoms, the, 116
Bracero Program, 9
Brown, Lee P., 17, 105–106, 131
Brown v. Board of Education, 25
Bush, George W., 94n.2, 105
busing, 104
California, 27, 28, 49, 111, 118. See also Los Angeles
Catholicism, 53, 54, 55, 98
census, U.S.: 1900, 7; 1970, 9; 1980, 11, 14; 1990, 12, 14, 125; 2000, xi, 1, 17, 44, 111
Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS)(University of Houston), 5
Central Americans, 12, 56
children: contributions of, to family income, 88; racial attitudes of, as formed by parents, 68–73, 89; role of, in family, 55–56, 65
Christianity, 96
citizenship, 64, 114
civil rights, 49; denial of, to Hispanics, 24, 25, 27, 37, 40; for gays, 98, 99
Civil Rights Act of 1964, 8, 59
civil rights movement, 10, 47, 48, 64, 112
classism, 83–85
Collective Self-Esteem Scale, 42n.3
Colombians, 5
common group unity, 122–128, 130
communism, 10
competition for resources, 39, 62, 81–82, 118, 119, 132; as a means of generating and maintaining stereotypes, 27–28; as a source of conflict, 57–58, 84
conflict, 56–60, 63, 104; between women of color, 82–93
crime, 27, 90
criminal justice system, 8, 23
Cubans, 17, 121
cultural values. See values
Deep South, 1, 112
Democratic party, 105, 107, 108, 109, 115
demographics, xi, xii, 3, 4, 27, 49, 73, 111

-145-

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