52. AGAINST CALLIPPUS

INTRODUCTION

This speech was written for delivery by Apollodorus, and in all likelihood he was also its author. If so, this is the earliest of his surviving speeches. The court case arose from the banking activities of Pasion, Apollodorus’ father (see pp. 12–13). Lycon, a man from Heraclea, a town on the southeast coast of the Black Sea, had deposited money with Pasion. Before leaving Athens on an ill-fated voyage, he reviewed the account and left instructions for paying it out to a partner, a certain Cephisiades. Callippus, if we believe the speaker, attempted to lay his hands on Lycon’s money by abusing his position as a consular representative (proxenos) of the Heracleans.1 The narrative suggests that Callippus saw his chances of getting the money in question as very much greater once Pasion died, for the arbitrator who felt reluctance in ruling against a figure with considerable standing in the city would be far less inhibited in acting against his son. This makes it likely that the suit to which this speech responds came to court in 369/8, the year following Pasion’s death (Dem. 46.13). This date, which falls some five years before Demosthenes reached majority and began legal action against his guardians, would of course preclude Demosthenic authorship. The style, moreover, seems to fit well with other

1Aproxenos’ function was rather like that of a modern diplomat from a foreign country who deals mostly with individuals in matters of visas, passports, or difficulties encountered by his fellow citizens with the local authorities. In ancient Greek practice, however, he would be a citizen of the city-state in which he operated, helping citizens of another state. Thus, Callippus, an Athenian citizen, was expected to render assistance to citizens of Heraclea who were visiting Athens.

-46-

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Speeches 50-59
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor’s Preface ix
  • Translator’s Preface xi
  • Series Introduction Greek Oratory xiii
  • Introduction to Demosthenes 3
  • Introduction to This Volume 9
  • 50- Against Polycles in the Matter of a Period of Supplementary Service as Trierarch 19
  • 51- On the Trierarchic Crown 39
  • 52- Against Callippus 46
  • 53- Against Nicostratus 56
  • 54- Against Conon 66
  • 55- Against Callicles for Damage to Property 81
  • 56- Against Dionysodorus for Damages 92
  • 57- Appeal against Eubulides 107
  • 58- Against Theocrines 129
  • 59- Against Neaera 151
  • Index 195
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