57. APPEAL AGAINST EUBULIDES

INTRODUCTION

This speech and Against Neaera (Dem. 59) revolve around the issue of Athenian citizenship. The stakes were very high: it is no rhetorical exaggeration when in the opening section the speaker equates conviction with ruin, for he was to be sold into slavery if he lost the case (though at 65 it appears that an unsuccessful appellant might be expected to escape from Attica before that happened).

A man named Euxitheus came before an Athenian court to present an appeal (ephesis) of the decision of his deme, Halimus, to strike him from its official register of deme members (lēxiarchikon grammateion). Although the trial arises from an appeal, the deme takes the role of prosecutor, represented by Eubulides and four other elected deme officers, an exception to the general rule that prosecution in the Athenian judicial system lay in the hands of volunteers.1 Euxitheus had been removed from the register in the course of a review (diapsēphisis) in which the status of each member was confirmed by the vote of all members present. He claims that he meets the requirement of citizenship—descent from an Athenian mother and father—and that Eubulides,2 the man responsible for his expulsion, acted out of personal enmity. The procedure and penalties relevant to this case are known from internal evidence, Ath. Pol. 42 and the hypothesis (summary) of the speech provided by Libanius (fourth century AD).3 This hypothesis

1 Another unusual feature: there was no penalty for unsuccessful prosecution.

2 Eubulides is known from an inscription to have served as a member of the Council in the same year that the diapsēphisis was enacted.

3 See also Is. 12, which also concerns the denial of citizenship during the same review, but where the procedure is rather different.

-107-

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Speeches 50-59
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor’s Preface ix
  • Translator’s Preface xi
  • Series Introduction Greek Oratory xiii
  • Introduction to Demosthenes 3
  • Introduction to This Volume 9
  • 50- Against Polycles in the Matter of a Period of Supplementary Service as Trierarch 19
  • 51- On the Trierarchic Crown 39
  • 52- Against Callippus 46
  • 53- Against Nicostratus 56
  • 54- Against Conon 66
  • 55- Against Callicles for Damage to Property 81
  • 56- Against Dionysodorus for Damages 92
  • 57- Appeal against Eubulides 107
  • 58- Against Theocrines 129
  • 59- Against Neaera 151
  • Index 195
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