Drugs & Democracy in Rio de Janeiro: Trafficking, Social Networks, & Public Security

By Enrique Desmond Arias | Go to book overview

PREFACE
Departure

Around 10:00 P.M. one rainy Friday night, a friend and I drove out of a favela (shantytown) and headed up an access ramp onto one of the major highways that runs from Rio de Janeiro’s gritty working-class Zona Norte (North Zone) to the glittering seaside Zona Sul (South Zone). As we rounded the curve on the slick incline, our tires lost traction and the car spun out of control as other vehicles bore down behind us.

A few minutes earlier, we had left a notoriously crime-ridden favela where my friend, a European ex-patriot, runs a nongovernmental organization (NGO) focused on keeping at-risk adolescents out of criminal activity. He had received some substantial funding over the past year and was in the process of completing an expansion of the NGO’s facilities that would allow for a dramatic increase in his group’s services. As we drove to the community that evening, he had told me that he had asked me to come out there with him to serve as his guinea pig. The favela had just come through a rash of gunfights between police and the local drug gang, and my friend wanted to show his new construction to donors and other visitors who would arrive in Brazil in a few weeks. My place in all this was to see how the drug dealers who had a heavy presence on the favela’s main street would react to my friend showing up with an unknown outsider on a Friday evening, a peak drugdealing time.

We arrived in the favela around 8:00 P.M. As things go in Rio’s favelas, we had to turn down our headlights so as not to provoke a hail of bullets from the traffickers who had positioned themselves at the entrance of the community. We drove down the street past the usual groups of young people and adults out enjoying their Friday night in this very busy favela. Along the way we passed the occasional boca de fumo (mouth of smoke, drug sales point), where a group of adolescents and young men would sit with automatic rifles and other weapons selling cocaine and marijuana.

We parked our car and walked to the NGO’s facilities. As we strolled down the main street, we passed several bars playing blisteringly loud music where groups of men sat, drank beer, and somehow managed to carry on conversations. With

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Drugs & Democracy in Rio de Janeiro: Trafficking, Social Networks, & Public Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface - Departure ix
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Introduction - Thinking about Social Violence in Brazil 1
  • One - Setting the Scene- Continuities and Discontinuities in a "Divided City" 18
  • Two - Network Approach to Criminal Politics 39
  • Three - Tubarão 61
  • Four - Santa Ana 97
  • Five - Vigário Geral 130
  • Six - Comparative Analysis of Criminal Networks in Brazil and Latin America 169
  • Seven - Theorizing the Politics of Social Violence 189
  • Epilogue - Rio 2005 207
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 241
  • Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 279

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.