English Common Law in the Age of Mansfield

By James Oldham | Go to book overview
Appendix: Table of Regnal Years
SovereignDate of AccessionNo. of Years of Reign
William I25 Dec. 106621
William II26 Sept. 108713
Henry I5 Aug. 110036
Stephen22 Dec. 113519
Henry II19 Dec. 115435
Richard I23 Sept. 118910
John27 May 119918
Henry III28 Oct. 121657
Edward I20 Nov. 127235
Edward II8 July 130720
Edward III25 Jan. 132751
Richard II22 June 137723
Henry IV30 Sept. 139914
Henry V21 Mar. 141310
Henry VI1 Sept. 142239
Edward IV4 Mar. 146123
Edward V9 Apr. 14831
Richard III26 June 14833
Henry VII22 Aug. 148524
Henry VIII22 Apr. 150938
Edward VI28 Jan. 15477
Mary19 July 15532
Philip and Mary25 July 15544
Elizabeth17 Nov. 155845
James I24 Mar. 160323
Charles I27 Mar. 162524
The Commonwealth30 Jan. 164911
Charles II29 May 166037
James II6 Feb. 16854
William and Mary13 Feb. 16896

-371-

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English Common Law in the Age of Mansfield
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies in Legal History iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Editorial Statement xv
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Part One - Mansfield and the Court of King’s Bench 1
  • Chapter One - Lord Mansfield 3
  • Chapter Two - The Court of King’s Bench 12
  • Part Two - Commerce and Contract 77
  • Chapter Three - Contract and Quasi-Contract 79
  • Chapter Four - Bankruptcy 107
  • Chapter Five - Insurance 124
  • Chapter Six - Negotiable Instruments 152
  • Chapter Seven - Usury 165
  • Chapter Eight - Prize and Trade 177
  • Chapter Nine - Intellectual Property 190
  • Part Three - Crime and Tort 207
  • Chapter Ten - Libel 209
  • Chapter Eleven - Restrictions on Religious Observance 236
  • Chapter Twelve - Nuisance 248
  • Chapter Thirteen - Assault, False Imprisonment, and Offenses against Public Order and Welfare 260
  • Chapter Fourteen - Perjury 268
  • Chapter Fifteen - Negligence 276
  • Chapter Sixteen - Trespass and Trover 292
  • Part Four - Status and Property 303
  • Chapter Seventeen - Slavery 305
  • Chapter Eighteen - Marriage 324
  • Chapter Nineteen - Labor and Employment 343
  • Chapter Twenty - Property and Wills 356
  • Conclusion 364
  • Appendix- Table of Regnal Years 371
  • Bibliography 373
  • Table of Statutes 393
  • Table of Cases 395
  • General Index 409
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