Powwow

By Clyde Ellis; Luke Eric Lassiter et al. | Go to book overview

SAMUEL R. COOK, JOHN L. JOHNS, AND KARENNE WOOD


10.
The Monacan Nation Powwow:
Symbol of Indigenous Survival and Resistance
in the Tobacco Row Mountains

On Sunday afternoon, May 23, 1999, two eagle feathers dropped in the arena at the Monacan Indian Nation’s Seventh Annual Powwow. This, of course, is one of the most serious occurrences at any powwow and may be dealt with in a variety of ways depending on regional, tribal, and community norms. In this case the emcee cleared the arena and an elder retrieved the feathers while the host drum sang an appropriate honor song.

Approximately an hour and a half later – around 4:30 p.m. – the emcee announced that Thomasina Jordan, then-chair of the Virginia Council on Indians (a state-funded advisory group consisting of representatives from Virginia’s eight state-recognized tribes), had passed away that afternoon after a long battle with cancer.1 Ms. Jordan’s passing occurred at the same time that the eagle feathers fell in the powwow arena. Whether anyone attached any supernatural significance to this occurrence, all Virginia Indians (and anyone who knew something of the peculiar and turbulent history of Indian-white relations in the state in the mid-twentieth century) realized the symbolic shock of the coinciding events. Jordan was a vocal political activist and proponent of Indian rights in a state where, until recently, Indians did not dare express discontent with state and local policies and power structures that relegated them to second-class citizenship at best. As Jordan drew her last breath, the feathers fell on soil in a county that (as will be discussed later in this chapter) was at the vanguard of Virginia racial integrity policies aimed at removing them from the state’s legal record – a county where no one would have dared to hold a powwow until the late 1990s.

Yet such a powwow did become a reality in the late 1990s, and, in addition to becoming a well-known intertribal gathering in the Southeast/mid-Atlantic corridor, it marks one of the largest annual gatherings of Monacan tribal members. This is an interesting phenomenon considering that the majority of people in the Monacan community had never attended a powwow (nor

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Powwow
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 309

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.