Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning

By Linda Adler-Kassner; Peggy O’Neill | Go to book overview

5
REFRAMING IN ACTION

So far, we have been discussing the issue of reframing writing assessment through historical and theoretical lenses, and describing some processes writing instructors might use for reframing. In this chapter, we move away from abstract discussions to examine how reframing works in the complexity and messiness of the real world. We offer examples of real writing instructors and program coordinators working in real institutions under the real constraints we all experience. While we have selected these case studies purposefully to showcase successful, positive reframing efforts, we also acknowledge that these are not “ideal” or “perfect” models of reframing. (We discuss some of the complexities of reframing in chapter six, as well.) After all, most of us are not living in ideal worlds but rather the messier, more difficult and challenging conditions of higher education in the early twenty-first century. We have also selected different types of writing programs (i.e., first-year, writing center, and writing across the curriculum) and different types of institutions (i.e., two-year college, public comprehensive, and private liberal-arts-focused comprehensive) so readers can see how strategies, techniques, and challenges play out in different sites.

In all of these cases—some from our own original research and others from the published literature—the writing instructors, program directors, writing center directors, or department heads doing the assessment work didn’t use the terminology of reframing we offer but rather explained or described their efforts in terms of trying to get something done in their postsecondary institutions. We highlight the way their work illustrates our claims and, at times, offer suggestions on ways they might

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Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Higher Education, Framing, and Writing Assessment 1
  • 2 - Framing (and) American Education 13
  • 3 - The Framing of Composition and Writing Assessment 40
  • 4 - Reframing Strategies and Techniques 81
  • 5 - Reframing in Action 110
  • 6 - Reframing Assessment 145
  • 7 - Reimagining Writing Assessment 179
  • References 192
  • Index 205
  • About the Authors 208
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