Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning

By Linda Adler-Kassner; Peggy O’Neill | Go to book overview

6
REFRAMING ASSESSMENT

Why Does My Participation Matter?

If we ignore this change and don’t try to have a voice to
stem the tide, we’re sort of responsible for it happening in a
way….If you’re going to be a professional, you have to
look at the larger world that your own system sits within and
think about the relationships between the different levels of
this system….If we don’t get involved and try to make the
system better, I think we’re abdicating our responsibilities as
professionals
.

Professor Chaco, interview

In the last chapter, we saw how writing instructors and program administrators in different types of institutions and programs have used a variety of strategies to reframe writing assessment on their campuses. We also demonstrated how the efforts of these writing professionals reflect a number of the strategies described in chapter four that we believe are essential for this work: building alliances, thinking about values and actions, and communicating with stakeholders in a variety of different ways. In this chapter, we delve more deeply into some of the messy complexities of reframing writing assessment. We begin by summarizing interviews with two professors who are involved with this work at the national level, Professors Chaco and Embler. Both have taught a variety of writing, reading, and English Language Arts classes and have served in a number of positions within their postsecondary institutions. They also both have extensive experience working with a variety of nationally prominent groups who have attempted to effect and continue to effect educational policy, both at the K–12 and postsecondary level. We then return to the pressing issues facing writing

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Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Higher Education, Framing, and Writing Assessment 1
  • 2 - Framing (and) American Education 13
  • 3 - The Framing of Composition and Writing Assessment 40
  • 4 - Reframing Strategies and Techniques 81
  • 5 - Reframing in Action 110
  • 6 - Reframing Assessment 145
  • 7 - Reimagining Writing Assessment 179
  • References 192
  • Index 205
  • About the Authors 208
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