The Search for a Common Language: Environmental Writing and Education

By Melody Graulich; Paul Crumbley | Go to book overview

The Search for a Common Language
Environmental Writing and Education

Edited and with an Introduction
by
Melody Graulich and Paul Crumbley

Utah State University Press
Logan, Utah

-iii-

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The Search for a Common Language: Environmental Writing and Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction- Paul Crumbley and Melody Graulich 1
  • Preliminary Reflections on Matters Environmental 18
  • The Poets 23
  • Painted Lady 24
  • Who Lost the Limberlost? Education and Language in a Mis-Placed Age 25
  • The Silliest Debate 34
  • Cousins What the Great Apes Tell Us about Human Origins 35
  • Why Dogs Stopped Flying 46
  • How Science and the Public Can Lead to Better Decision Making in Earth System Management 47
  • Martha (1 September 1914) 59
  • What Is the L.a. River? 60
  • The River Blind 68
  • The Unexpected Environmentalist Building a Centrist Coalition 69
  • Dermatophagoides 83
  • At Cloudy Pass the Need of Being Versed in Human Things 84
  • Trying Not to Lie 88
  • Tuttle Road Landscape as Environmental Text 89
  • The Tarantula Hawk 102
  • Begin with a River 103
  • How to Train a Horse to Burn 114
  • The Natural West 115
  • Sheep 128
  • Separation Anxiety the Perilous Alienation of Humans from the Wild 129
  • Largest Living Organism on Earth 135
  • Going South 136
  • "Now the Sun Has Come to Earth" 147
  • The Pleiades 149
  • Scarlet Penstemon 163
  • Poetry Reading at the Tanner Conference 164
  • Common Cause in Common Voice 192
  • Notes 197
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