Teaching Composition as a Social Process

By Bruce McComiskey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

MANY STUDENTS, TEACHERS, FRIENDS, AND COLLEAGUES HAVE CONtributed greatly to this project. Writing is, of course, a social process, and I could never have composed this manuscript without their engaging conversations and critical readings. I would first like to thank my colleagues and friends who read portions of this book while it was still in draft form, including Cynthia Ryan, John Trimbur, Todd Goodson, Frank Farmer, Jeffrey Williams, and Tracey Baker. I would also like to thank Utah State University Press director, Michael Spooner, and USUP’s anonymous reviewers for their encouragement and helpful comments. Many thanks are also due to those who, over the past two decades and in various ways, have encouraged my love for writing and teaching, especially Jan Neuleib, Edward Schiappa, Janice Lauer, James Berlin, and my father Thomas McComiskey.

Of course, any project like this would simply be incomplete without a heartfelt thank-you to all the students who took the courses and responded to the assignments described here. Even the most soundly designed curriculum cannot succeed without dedicated students to engage it.

Parts or all of some chapters in this book have appeared elsewhere. Thanks to the publishers of Composition Forum, JAC, Rhetoric Review, TETYC, and of the book Reforming College Composition for their generous permission to reprint. Full citations appear on the copyright page.

-ix-

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