Warrior Ways: Explorations in Modern Military Folklore

By Eric A. Eliason; Tad Tuleja | Go to book overview

Contributors

ERIC A. ELIASON is a professor of folklore at Brigham Young University. An avid field researcher, he has published on Mormon, Caribbean, Russian, English, Afghan, American, Mexican, and biblical cultural traditions. His books include The J. Golden Kimball Stories, Wild Games: Hunting and Fishing Traditions in North America (with Dennis Cutchins), Black Velvet Art, and the forthcoming Latter-day Lore: A Handbook of Mormon Folklore Studies (with Tom Mould). He is writing the folklore chapter for the forthcoming Oxford Companion to Mormonism. From 2002 to 2008 Eliason was the chaplain for the First Battalion, Nineteenth Special Forces in the Utah Army National Guard. He served in Afghanistan, in the Philippines, and at Arlington National Cemetery. He lives in Springville, Utah, with his wife and four children.

TAD TULEJA teaches writing at American University and has published widely in the humanities and social sciences. His books on American subjects include American History in 100 Nutshells, The New York Public Library Book of Popular Americana, and the edited volume Usable Pasts: Traditions and Group Expressions in North America. The son of a naval officer and military historian, he has a longstanding interest in the anthropology of warfare and has written papers on yellow ribbons, the unofficial slogans of military elites, and the reported abuse of returning Vietnam War veterans. At Harvard, Princeton, Willamette University, and the University of Oklahoma, Tuleja taught courses that examined war and gender, justwar theory, and military memoirs. He holds master’s degrees from Cornell and the University of Sussex (England) and a PhD in folklore and anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin.

CAROL BURKE, professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, holds a PhD in English from the University of Maryland. She combines her ethnographic skills as a folklorist with an interest in literary journalism. Her publications include Camp All-American, Hanoi Jane, and the High-and-Tight, a study of military culture; Women’s Visions, which explores accounts of the supernatural exchanged by women in prison; The Creative Process (coauthored with Molly Tinsley), a creative writing text; the collections of family folklore Plain Talk and Back in Those Days (the latter coauthored with Martin Light); Close Quarters, a collection of poems; and articles in the Nation and the New Republic. She also wrote the “Military Folklore” entry for American Folklore: An Encyclopedia, edited by Jan Brunvand; and guest edited the New Directions in Folklore special issue on military folklore. In 2008–9, on leave from the University of California, she did

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