Writing New Media: Theory and Applications for Expanding the Teaching of Composition

By Anne Frances Wysocki; Johndan Johnson-Eilola et al. | Go to book overview

RHETORICAL OBSERVATIONS
HOMEWORK
A DESIGN ANALYSIS,
USING YOUR DESIGN
GUIDELINES

THE PURPOSE OF THIS ASSIGNMENT
Now I want you to start applying the design guidelines you generated by using them to analyze other layouts. By applying your guidelines—through analyzing how the guidelines apply to different layouts—you’ll be thinking about how and why visual designers make some of the design choices they do.
WHAT TO DO
Find 2 new layouts: the first is to be from the same category for which you have developed design guidelines; the second is to be from any other category.Use the design guidelines that you wrote for the previous class to help you look closely at the two layouts. Your observations should be typed—try to use a page layout application (like InDesign or Quark), and be sure to think of your page(s) as a design.For EACH layout, do the following in your writing:
Describe, first, how the layout follows the guidelines you’ve written, and then describe how the layout deviates from those guidelines.
Then speculate about the audience for whom the layout is intended. As you describe the kind of audience for whom you think the layout is intended, use the evidence of the layout to support your argument: that is, use not only the evidence of what is in the layout (the product being presented) but also the layout itself: What kind of audience (for example) would be drawn by the kind of typefaces used in the layout? or What kind of audience would be drawn by the strong central (or curvy) alignment of the layout? Whatever evidence you can see to support your contention for the audience for whom the layout is intended, write it up.
After you have written about both layouts, write up some observations about why you think the one category of design uses certain visual strategies while the other doesn’t. Is it because of different audiences, or different products, or attempting to evoke different relationships between audience and product…?

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