Black Mayors, White Majorities: The Balancing Act of Racial Politics

By Ravi K. Perry | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Are We “to Be” or Not?
The Push and Pull of Race in Dayton Politics

It is a struggle; for though the black man fights passively, he nevertheless
fights; and his passive resistance is more effective at present than active
resistance could possibly be. He bears the fury of the storm, as does the
willow tree
.

James Weldon Johnson

The history of race and politics in Dayton has been marked not by gradual progress toward better social and political harmony but rather by the push of racial progress alongside the pull of racial prejudice. During the 1970s and 1980s, when other medium-sized and large Midwestern cities with minority-black populations elected black mayors, Dayton did too, first appointing James McGee in 1970 and then reelecting him through 1982. McGee would become Dayton’s longestserving mayor. McGee, an attorney, had previously served as a city commissioner, replacing the city council’s first black member, Don Crawford, who had been elected in 1961. Dayton also sent black politician C. J. McLin Jr., Rhine’s father, to the Ohio House of Representatives in 1966. A powerful black politician in the state of Ohio, McLin would later become a special adviser to Ohio governor John Gilligan and an active voice on behalf of the black community in Dayton and throughout the region.1 Alongside this progress in black political empowerment, however, a number of incidents revealed the extent of racial prejudice in Dayton. In 1963, when the black family of James Fuller moved into the Townview section of Madison Township, a

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Mayors, White Majorities: The Balancing Act of Racial Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.