The Civilizing Machine: A Cultural History of Mexican Railroads, 1876-1910

By Michael Matthews | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abrahams, Roger. “The Language of Festivals: Celebrating the Economy.” In Celebration: Studies in Festival and Ritual, ed. Victor Turner, 161– 77. Washington dc: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1982.

Adame Goddard, Jorge. El pensamineto político y social de los católicos mexicanos, 1867–1914. Mexico: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, 1981.

Adas, Michael. Dominance by Design: Technological Imperative and America’s Civilizing Mission. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2006.

———. Machines as the Measure of Men: Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1989.

Agostini, Claudia. Monuments of Progress: Modernization and Public Health in Mexico City, 1876–1910. Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2003.

Alba, Victor. “The Mexican Revolution and the Cartoon.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 9, no. 2 (1967): 121–36.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origins and Spread of Nationalism. Rev. ed. London: Verso, 1991.

Anderson, Rodney. Outcasts in Their Own Land: Mexican Industrial Workers, 1906–1911. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1976.

Anna, Timothy. Forging Mexico: 1821–1835. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1998.

Aplicación de la Responsibildad Civil á los Siniestros en los Ferrocarriles: Apuntes de Alegato de la Compañia del Ferrocarril Interoceanico en el Juicio Promovido por D. Joaquín Cardoso sobre Indemnificación por Perjuicios Ocasionados en el Siniestro de 28 de Febrero 1892. Mexico: Imp. F. Díaz de León Suce, sa, 1893.

Avitia Hernández, Antonio. Corrido histórico Mexicano: Voy a cantarles la historia. Vol. 1. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1997.

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