Prairie Forge: The Extraordinary Story of the Nebraska Scrap Metal Drive of World War II

By James J. Kimble | Go to book overview

Epilogue
Home Front, Battlefront (Revisited)

To American production, without which this war would have been lost.
— Joseph Stalin, offering a toast at a meeting of
Allied leaders in Tehran (1943)

Henry Doorly had spoken about scrap metal on the radio before, but this was his largest audience yet. It was May 18, 1943, and the Blue Network show “This Nation at War!” was interviewing the publisher because the World-Herald had recently won the Pulitzer Prize for public service due to its leadership in the national scrap metal campaign. Doorly explained again, this time for a nationwide audience, how his wife had challenged him to do something about the scrap situation and how the newspaper had then sponsored the effort. The statewide campaign, he now emphasized, was successful not only because it ultimately made it possible to keep “the steel mills going throughout the winter and the spring” but also because “the whole population of Nebraska had only one purpose” during the drive, “and that was collecting and donating scrap.” He gracefully concluded that it was “the people of Nebraska … who made it possible for us to secure the honor of the Pulitzer Prize.”1

The publisher’s broadcast interview took place less than a year after the Nebraska Plan first began to take shape, and so it is probable that he was still too close to the event to be able to offer a distanced assessment.

-146-

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Prairie Forge: The Extraordinary Story of the Nebraska Scrap Metal Drive of World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction - Home Front, Battlefront 1
  • 1 - The Scrap Deficit, or How Not to Win a War 12
  • 2 - Henry Doorly and the Nebraska Plan 32
  • 3 - Summertime Scrapping in the City 51
  • 4 - Mobilizing Greater Nebraska 77
  • 5 - The Second-Half Comeback 100
  • 6 - The Nebraska Plan Goes National 123
  • Epilogue - Home Front, Battlefront (Revisited) 146
  • Appendix 159
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 209
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