Railroad Radicals in Cold War Mexico: Gender, Class, and Memory

By Robert F. Alegre | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Interview with Geraldo Niño Mendes, by author, Puebla, January 2004.

2. Prior to the 1960s, women worked primarily as nurses. In the 1960s the FNM began employing women as office workers. Never did the company employ women to work on trains or in repair yards.

3. Railroad workers were known as rieleros or ferrocarrileros; railway women were known as rieleras or ferrocarrileras.

4. Interview with Ruth Ramírez, by author, Puebla, February 2004.

5. Mexico experienced significant economic growth and industrialization in the 1930s; industrialists built upon this foundation during the postwar period. Cárdenas, La industrialización mexicana durante la Gran Depresión, 9–12.

6. Olcott, Revolutionary Women; Padilla, Rural Resistance in the Land of Zapata; Rubin, Decentering the Regime; B. T. Smith, Pistoleros and Popular Movements. For a cultural take on postwar dissent, see Zolov, Refried Elvis.

7. Olcott, Revolutionary Women, 25.

8. For a study that includes a discussion of the railway strikes in the context of the corporatist state, see Berins Collier and Collier, Shaping the Political Arena; other works on Mexican corporatism include Fagen and Tuohy, Politics and Privilege in a Mexican City; Craig and Foweraker, eds., Popular Movements and Political Change in Mexico; González Casanova, Democracy in Mexico; Hamilton, Limits of State Autonomy; Hansen, Politics of Mexican Development; Needleman and Needleman, “Who Rules Mexico?”; P. Smith, Labyrinths of Power.

9. Roxborough, Unions and Politics in Mexico, 25.

10. Those interested in the history of Mexican labor should consult the following essential works: Anderson, Outcasts in Their Own Land; Bortz, Revolution within the Revolution; Carr, El movimiento obrero y la política en México; French, A Peaceful and Working People; Hart, Anarchism and the Mexican Working Class; Porter, Working Women in Mexico City; Snodgrass, Deference and Defiance in Monterrey. For recent studies that analyze the gendered character of both the labor process and working-

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