Eleventh Hour: The Politics of Policy Initiatives in Presidential Transitions

By David M. Shafie | Go to book overview

References

Sources consulted at the Jimmy Carter Library, Atlanta, Georgia, are indicated as JCL, with folder, file, and/or box number.

Abramowitz, Alan I. 2011. “Expect Confrontation, Not Compromise: The 112th House of Representatives Is Likely to Be the Most Conservative and Polarized House in the Modern Era.” PS: Political Science and Politics 44 (2): 293–96.

Abramowitz, Michael, and Steven Mufson. 2007. “Papers Detail Industry’s Role in Cheney’s Energy Report.” Washington Post, July 18, A1.

Aderman, Gary. 1979. “Energy Standards for New Buildings—An Exercise in Futility?” National Journal 8 (June 30): 1083–85.

Alter, Jonathan. 2010. The Promise: President Obama’s First Year. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Anderson, Martin. 1990. Revolution: The Reagan Legacy, 2nd ed. Stanford, Calif.: Hoover Institution.

Andrews, Richard N. L. 2006. “Risk-Based Decision-Making: Policy, Science and Politics.” In Environmental Policy: New Directions for the Twenty-First Century, 6th ed., edited by Norman J. Vig and Michael E. Kraft, 215–38. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press.

Bailey, Christopher J. 1998. Congress and Air Pollution. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press.

“Ban Is Urged on Cigarette Smoke in Public Places.” 1992. New York Times, June 11, A20.

Barringer, Felicity. 1981. “Job Noise Rules Stretched to Cover More Ears” Washington Post, August 21, A27.

———.2008. “Effort to Relax Pollution Limits Is Dropped.” New York Times, December 11, A34.

Beermann, Jack M. 2003. “Presidential Power in Transitions.” Boston University Law Review 83 (5): 947–1017.

Bernick, Katherine. 1980. Memorandum to Stuart Eizenstat. “OSHA’s Noise Standard.” December 12. (JCL: FG 21–5.)

Berry, Jeffrey M. 1984. The Interest Group Society. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Berry, Jeffrey M., and Kent E. Portney. 1995. “Centralizing Regulatory Control and Interest Group Access: The Quayle Council on Competitiveness.” In

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