African Americans in South Texas History

By Bruce A. Glasrud | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

AT A FALL 2008 LUNCH GATHERING OF SOUTH TEXAS historians, aka the Victoria Secrets, the question raised was “Where/what is South Texas?” The essential element to this question, we determined, was “What are the boundaries of South Texas?” Upon perusing a map, and with considerable discussion, some of it knowledgeable, some from former Yankees, the conclusion—although not unanimous—was this: South Texas is that portion of the Lone Star state reaching from Eagle Pass on the Rio Grande to San Antonio, thence following a line along today’s Interstate 10 to the Brazos River; the eastern border then follows the Brazos down to the coast, and includes everything between there and the Rio Grande. The southern boundary then follows the Rio Grande westward to Eagle Pass. This, then, is the South Texas described in African Americans in South Texas History.

African Americans in South Texas History was not completed without assistance and encouragement from a number of people. As noted earlier, the group of historians composing the closely knit group, the Victoria Secrets, supported and aided in the preparation of this volume. Thanks, friends. Too often do I fail to acknowledge the editorial debt I owe to my wife, Pearlene Vestal Glasrud. Thanks, Pearlene. The staff at the Seguin Public library enthusiastically and quickly filled my numerous requests for an article or a book. The late Bill Stein, director of the Nesbitt Memorial Library at Columbus, Texas, invited me to the library and kept bringing books and journals to me while at the same time asking either “Why?” or “Do you know what that means?” Prior to his questioning, I did not always know the

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