Matamoros and the Texas Revolution

By Craig H. Roell | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THERE IS A SENTIMENT that nothing in Texas is without controversy. Certainly this is true about Matamoros and the Texas Revolution. As in any great family argument, points of view abound; it is with disquietude that one even enters into the discussion. Still, I am thankful for the opportunity. My own vision was shaped initially by growing up in Victoria, Texas, just up the road from Goliad, in the heart of this venerable history. Many years later, as a Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher Stark Foundation Fellow in Texas Studies at the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA), I wrote about the Matamoros expedition, among other subjects, for The New Handbook of Texas (1996). Ron Tyler, then director of TSHA, encouraged me to expand my Handbook article “Matamoros Expedition of 1835–36” into a book-length study. I explored the possibilities in a presentation at the 1998 Symposium on the Early History of the Goliad and Victoria Area and in a paper prepared for the 2002 TSHA annual meeting.

Janice Pinney, formerly TSHA’s interim director of publications, supported my endeavor in its earliest stages. Ryan Schumacher, current associate editor at TSHA, and Randolph “Mike” Campbell, TSHA’s chief historian, fostered my manuscript into print. I am indebted to them and to Bonnie Lovell for her advice and thorough critique of the manuscript, which have made for a much better book. I appreciate the special map created by Alexander Mendoza at the University of North Texas, and the labor of book designer David Timmons and indexer Cindy Coan. I am grateful to the many scholars identified in the notes. To name one would require naming them all; simply put, their excellent works informed this book and made it possible. Beyond their superb scholarship, James E. Crisp, Stephen L. Hardin, Jesús “Frank” de la Teja, and Stuart Reid personally encouraged my own efforts. Moreover, I am grateful to the wealth of resources made available by the city of Heróica Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico; the Colegio de la Frontero Norte (El Colef); the University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College; the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection and the Dolph Briscoe Center for

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