Prosecution among Friends: Presidents, Attorneys General, and Executive Branch Wrongdoing

By David Alistair Yalof | Go to book overview

chapter 4
A Bit Too Familiar
When the Justice Department Investigates
the Justice Department

Perhaps the most obvious conflict of interest that arises in the investigation and prosecution of executive branch corruption occurs when the hunter becomes the hunted. Officials within the Department of Justice and its many law enforcement agencies sometimes find themselves in the cross hairs of one of their department’s investigations, whether as the primary targets of an inquiry or as individuals whose activities are swept up in a larger investigation that originated elsewhere. In 1975, when Attorney General Edward Levi established the Office of Professional Responsibility within the Justice Department to investigate misconduct by its attorneys, the Office of Inspector General—also within the Justice Department—retained its primary responsibility for investigating misconduct by nonlawyers in the department. Ultimately, both those offices must answer directly to the attorney general and his deputies. Given how quickly public suspicions may arise when Justice Department lawyers are essentially investigating their own colleagues, the use of a special prosecutor can never be ruled out.

When the attorney general falls under scrutiny, any preliminary inquiry that turns up evidence of criminal wrongdoing offers a highly persuasive argument for letting an outside attorney or special prosecutor lead the investigation. Yet most cases are not so cut and dried, notwithstanding the presence of a legitimate conflict of interest. Indeed, if a special prosecutor had to be named every time a member of the Justice Department or one of its divisions played even a modest role in the factual circumstances of a crime (perhaps in the course of doing routine agency business), special prosecutors would soon outnumber career prosecutors by more than a handful.

From the public’s perspective, it is doubtful whether federal police and prosecutors can investigate their own ranks with the same energy and enthu-

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prosecution among Friends: Presidents, Attorneys General, and Executive Branch Wrongdoing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 201

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.