Prosecution among Friends: Presidents, Attorneys General, and Executive Branch Wrongdoing

By David Alistair Yalof | Go to book overview

chapter 5
More Political Considerations
Departed Officials, Looming Elections,
and the Influence of Partisan Opposition

An attorney general who is considering whether or not to appoint a special counsel or independent prosecutor is swimming in dangerous waters. The issues that he or she must sort out are many and complex, and the consequences of even one misstep along the way can be profoundly damaging. Three concerns are conspicuous among those that must be taken into account in this decisionmaking process. First is the political status of the official to be investigated; second, the timing of the investigation; and third, the extent to which united or divided government may affect the proceedings.

1. The political status of the official in question. When assessing the political context of a prosecution, the attorney general must of course consider the positions held by the targeted individuals, which are addressed extensively in chapters 3 and 4. Additionally, he or she must weigh (1) whether the targeted official owed his or her original appointment to the current president rather than to a past president who has left the scene, (2) whether the targeted official maintains strong partisan connections to the current president, as opposed to those who hail from the opposition party, and (3) whether the targeted official still holds the position or works in the office in which the misconduct is alleged to have taken place. Sometimes officials remain in the executive branch working in a different capacity; in other cases they may have left the administration altogether. Special prosecutor and independent counsel provisions tend to assume that misconduct has emanated from someone who still remains in a position to pose conflicts of interest.1 Clearly those who continue to hold the same public office in which they were accused of misconduct may be treated differently from those who no longer maintain their position of trust.

2. The timing of the investigation. As a president’s reelection campaign approaches, his administration begins to focus on expressly political concerns,

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prosecution among Friends: Presidents, Attorneys General, and Executive Branch Wrongdoing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 201

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.