Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism

By Thomas W. Devine | Go to book overview

PREFACE

In the election of 1948, Henry A. Wallace set out to challenge conventional wisdom. At a time when both major parties supported President Harry Truman’s foreign policy, Wallace claimed that militarists and international bankers had taken over the government and were deliberately leading the nation down the road to war. Though public opinion polls showed that most Americans viewed the Marshall Plan as a humanitarian aid program that would produce stability and economic recovery in Europe, he denounced it as a reactionary Wall Street plot designed to corner foreign markets, suppress civil liberties, and split the world into two “warring camps.” At a time when the vast majority of the population feared the spread of communism and considered the Soviet Union the primary impediment to world peace, Wallace insisted that domestic fascism and American imperialism posed the greater threat. American “monopolists,” he maintained, had manufactured the Cold War to divert attention from their global grab for power and profits. As the government took steps to clamp down on the activities of the American Communist Party, Wallace denounced the “Red Scare” and welcomed Communists into his campaign, arguing that it would violate the principles of Jeffersonian democracy to turn them away. And, as southern segregationists split from the Democratic Party rather than accept a platform that supported racial equality for African Americans, Wallace journeyed into the heart of Dixie and proclaimed that segregation was sin.

Inevitably, the Progressive nominee drew criticism for his unorthodox beliefs. Throughout 1948, many journalists and politicians dismissed Wallace as a bitter and confused man, full of contempt for President Truman and easily manipulated by the cynical “agents of the Kremlin” who surrounded him. Cartoonists portrayed him as marionette, mindlessly delivering the latest Moscow line while Stalin pulled the strings. Many of the nation’s newspaper editors assailed him as an “appeaser,” and even a traitor, who preached the insidious doctrine of “peace at any price.” Conservative columnists ridiculed the Iowa native as a “corn-fed mystic,” the unbalanced author of the bizarre “Guru letters,” and as an eccentric who had a long history of consorting with charlatans and falling hard

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 408

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.