Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism

By Thomas W. Devine | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have received much assistance in the writing of this book, and it is a pleasure finally to acknowledge those who have helped me along the way. Numerous archivists at scores of repositories around the United States facilitated the research process. I am particularly grateful to the Special Collections staff at the University of Iowa, who saw to my every need and slyly pointed out that one of the copying machines was not deducting money from the pay cards. Several individuals, many of them now deceased, shared their memories of the 1948 campaign with me: Daniel Aaron, Robert Bendiner, Lillian Gates, Irwin Ross, Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., George B. Tindall, Theodore F. Watts, and Nancy Wechsler. Norma Starobin, while searching for a recipe for gazpacho soup, came across her late husband’s notes taken at Communist Party meetings during the late 1940s, and kindly allowed me to consult them. Harvey Klehr directed me to several important documents in the Philip Jaffe Papers at Emory University. Peter Filene, Michael Hunt, and Roger Lotchin at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provided detailed feedback that significantly improved the manuscript. So, too, did John Earl Haynes, the Twentieth-Century Librarian at the Library of Congress. At various points during the revision process, John Broesamle, Alonzo Hamby, Donal O’Sullivan, Ronald Radosh, and W. J. Rorabaugh shared insights from their own work that helped me to sharpen my arguments.

On the financial side, a Mellon Foundation research fellowship, a Doris G. Quinn fellowship, and two George E. Mowry research grants defrayed travel expenses and gave me an extended and uninterrupted period that I could devote entirely to research and writing. Several summer stipends and research grants from the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at California State University, Northridge, assisted me in the later stages of this project.

I am sure there are many people who thought this book would never be finished. I count myself among them. Chuck Grench, my able and patient editor at the University of North Carolina Press, also comes to mind. More than anyone, I thank him for remaining committed to this project. I shudder to think how many times he must have been tempted to cut me loose. Paul Betz shepherded the manuscript through the various stages of production, and Petra Dreiser proved a careful and meticulous copyeditor. William L. O’Neill and Robert H. Zieger offered wise criticisms and unwarranted compliments in their reviews for UNC Press. I took both in the spirit they were offered and hope the final product demonstrates how much I valued their close reading of my work.

When this project began, I was a Philadelphian, late of Georgetown, improbably masquerading as a Tar Heel. As it ends, I am a transplanted easterner who, equally improbably, has come to love LA. My identity has transformed in more ways than one, however. Arriving at California State University, Northridge, I saw myself as a

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