Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome

By Brian Campbell | Go to book overview

INDEX OF PERSONS
Abidius Bassus, makes vow to nymphs,
133–34
Aburnius Torquatus, L., in charge of supplies on Euphrates, 454 (n. 93)
Acilius Balbus Sabinus, M. (curator), supervises restoration of bank of Tiber, 319
Aciona (deity), 444 (n. 149)
Aelius Aristides, water cures of, 337–38
Aelius Gallus (prefect of Egypt), friend of Strabo, 47
Aelius Strenuus, P. (patron of Danube boatmen), 293
Aemilius Paulus, L., erects statue of Castor and Pollux, 15
Aemilius Scaurus, M., road building of, 304
Aeneas, and foundation of Rome, 14
Aeneas Tacticus, and use of rivers in war,
162 Agennius Urbicus: and rivers, 426
(n. 224); work of on surveying, 94 Alexander of Abonouteichos, satirized by Lucian, 345
Alexander the Great: crosses Danube, 131; and Danube river craft, 293; on Pasitigris, 326
Allavonenses, involved in land dispute, 95–96
Ammianus Marcellinus: comments on Julian’s burial place, 387–88; describes Rhine, 374
Ampsivarii, petition governor, 372
Amulius, and legends of Rome’s foundation, 13
Ancus Marcius, and pons Sublicius, 21
Annaeus Florus, L., comments on Rhine, 191
Annaeus Lucanus M. (Lucan): comments on boats on Padus, 305; describes rivers of Italy, 127–28; river imagery of, 374
Annaeus Seneca, L.: comments of on
Rhine, 188–89; and rivers, 121
Annia Victorina, arranges water supply for Castulo, 244
Antistius Vetus, C., erects boundary stones, 87
Antoninus Pius (emperor), decisions of, 87, 111
Antonius Secundus, P., makes offering to Savus and Adsalluta, 138
Antonius Victorinus, celebrates spring at
Aquincum, 134
Aphareos (king of Messenia), names spring after wife, 68
Apollo Granus (deity), 500 (n. 214)
Appian, on importance of rivers as boundaries, 55
Apronius Raptor (patron of boatmen), 272
Arisenius Marius, P. (merchant), 283
Arruntius, L., discusses Tiber flooding, 118–19
Arruntius Claudianus, M. (prefect of Moesian fleet), 182
Arruntius Faustus, sets up memorial to river Ampsaga, 134
Artemidorus, on rivers and dreams, 128– 29
Asclepius/Aesculapius (deity), as instrument of healing, 338, 347
Asinius Gallus, C., establishes water supply, 243
Ateius Capito, C., discusses Tiber flooding, 118–19

-559-

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