The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture - Vol. 12

By Bill C. Malone | Go to book overview

INDEX
Page numbers in boldface refer to articles.
A&M Records, 258, 308
Abbeville, La., 66
ABC-Paramount, 202, 203
ABC Records, 182
Abshire, Nathan, 40, 159, 174
Academy Awards, 77, 245, 318
Academy of Country Music, 210, 282, 384
Acadians, 39, 153
Accordion, 3, 39, 40, 94, 95, 96, 155, 159, 259
Ace, Johnny, 108, 181, 271
Ackerman, Miss., 179
Acme, 200
Acuff, Roy, 11, 53, 81, 119, 159–61, 264, 381
Adam Olivier Orchestra, 260
Adams, Johnny, 218
Adderly, Nat and Julian, 88
Addison, Larry, 287
African-American Dance Ensemble of North Carolina, 59
African American music. See Black music
Afro-American Symphony, 47, 360
“After the Sunrise,” 72
Against the Current, 337
Aida (Price), 330
Ailey, Alvin, 59, 64, 161–62
“Ain’t Nobody Here but Us Chickens,” 108
Ain’t No Rag (Daniels), 210
Alabama, 21, 184, 283, 381; sacred harp singing in, 128, 131; Muscle Shoals Sound in, 299–300
Aladdin Records, 253
Albee, Edward, 353
Albert, Don, 87
“Alcohol and Jake Blues,” 263
Alcorn, Alvin, 326
Alexander, Arthur, 137, 301
“Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” 6
Al Greene and the Soul Mates, 239
Al Green Gets Next to You, 239
All-day singings, 162–63
Alleluia, 73
Allen, Lee, 219
Allen, O. K., 274
Allen, William Francis, 144
Allen, William T. “Hoss,” 113, 389
Allen Brothers, 322
Allen’s Brass Band, 20
Alligator Records, 368
Allison, Jerry, 251
Allison, Mose, 163–64
Allison, Mose, Sr., 163
Allman, Duane, 139, 165, 166, 324
Allman, Gregg, 139, 165
Allman Brothers Band, 125, 139, 141, 164– 66
Allman Brothers Band, The, 165
“Allons à Lafayette,” 159
Alpert, Herb, 258
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, 59, 64, 161, 289
Amazing Grace, 232
“Amazing Grace,” 222, 249, 349
Amazing Grace: A Country Salute to Gospel, 210
Amazing Rhythm Aces, 125
American Ballads and Folk Songs (Lomax), 278
American Banjo Three-Finger and Scruggs Style, 26, 347
American Conservatory of Music, 211
American Council of Learned Societies, 278
American Dance Festival, 59

-395-

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The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture - Vol. 12
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • General Introduction xiii
  • Introduction xix
  • Music 1
  • Index of Contributors 393
  • Index 395
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