FOREWORD

THIS BOOK IS IN NO SENSE A BIOGRAPHY OF FRANKLIN D. ROOSEvelt. It is rather a critical account of that episode in American politics known as the New Deal. As to the President, it is an account of an image projected upon the popular mind which came to be known as Franklin D. Roosevelt. It is the author's conviction that this image did not at all correspond to the man himself and that it is now time to correct the lineaments of this synthetic figure created by highly intelligent propaganda, aided by mass illusion and finally enlarged and elaborated out of all reason by the fierce moral and mental disturbances of the war. The purpose of this book, therefore, is to present the Franklin D. Roosevelt of the years 1932 to 1945 in his normal dimensions, reduced in size to agree with reality.

The war played havoc with history-writing after 1940. Not only did a great curtain of secrecy come down upon performers in the drama of the war, but their portraits and their actions were presented to us through the movies, the radio and the press upon a heroic scale as part of the business of selling the warriors and the statesmen and the war to the people. Their blunders and their quarrels were blotted out of the picture. Only the bright features were left. The casual citizen saw them as exalted beings moving in glory across the vast stage of war, uttering eloquent appeals to the nation, challenging the enemy in flaming words, striding like heroes and talking like gods.

The moment has come when the costumes, the grease paint, the falsely colored scenery, the technicolored spotlights and all the other artifices of make-up should be put aside and, in the interest of truth, the solid facts about the play and the players revealed to the people.

A whole 20-foot shelf of books has appeared glorifying the character and career of Franklin D. Roosevelt. In addition a large number of men and women who were associated with his administrations

-vii-

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The Roosevelt Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Book One 1
  • 1 - The New Dealer Takes the Deck 3
  • 4 - The New New Deal 33
  • 7 - An Enemy is Welcomed 77
  • Book Two 95
  • 1 97
  • 2 - War an the Courts 105
  • 5 - The Dame of the Philosopers 128
  • 7 - The Third Term 175
  • 10 - Henry Wallace 203
  • Book Three 231
  • A New Show Opens 233
  • 2 235
  • 3 258
  • 4 287
  • 5 299
  • 7 310
  • 8 - The Thought Police 320
  • 10 - Politics, Disease and History 331
  • 12 379
  • 13 387
  • 15 413
  • Reference 420
  • Bibliography 426
  • Index 430
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