America's First Black Socialist: The Radical Life of Peter H. Clark

By Nikki M. Taylor | Go to book overview

Chapter Five
Voice of Equality

I will never bind my hand so as not to vote for the proper man. I ask
you to stand fast in the liberty by which the Republican Party has made
you free, and don’t throw it away by any foolish pledges.

Peter Clark, My 1873

On the evening of April 11, 1870, Cincinnati’s African American community convened at Zion Baptist Church to discuss the upcoming local election the following Monday. The Fifteenth Amendment, which granted suffrage to African American men, had been ratified on February 3 of that year. Eager to exercise these new rights for the first time in history, these new voters and their families met before elections to outline the issues, debate the positions, endorse candidates, and advise one another on how to mark their ballots. According to one eyewitness, Zion was nearly filled to capacity with all classes of African Americans from “the nearly white persons, who have long been voters” to those who had only been recently emancipated from bondage in the South. Although the newly acquired right to vote was limited to African American men, this did not stop “scores” of African American women from attending the meeting.1 In many political meetings following Emancipation, women voiced their positions, helped define party loyalties, and weighed in about the way their male relatives would vote. Cincinnati’s African American men did not see voting as their sole prerogative; each of their votes would benefit the collective whole.2

Several people spoke that evening, including J. H. Perkins, William Parham, and Peter H. Clark. When he took the podium, Clark remarked that he had been present when the Republican Party was organized and had joined the party because of its antislavery position. He boasted that he had voted Republican in every election since 1856. As a free African American of mixed ancestry, Clark had been voting long before many of his peers, which placed him among the small percentage of those who

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America's First Black Socialist: The Radical Life of Peter H. Clark
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Launching a Life 16
  • Chapter Two - Voice of Emigration 42
  • Chapter Three - Voice of Purpose 61
  • Chapter Four - "The Silver Tongued Orator of the West" 87
  • Chapter Five - Voice of Equality 107
  • Chapter Six - Radical Voice 130
  • Chapter Seven - Voice of Dissent 156
  • Chapter Eight - Voice of Betrayal 171
  • Chapter Nine - A Still Voice 196
  • Chapter Ten - "A Painted Lie" 225
  • Acknowledgments 234
  • Notes 238
  • Selected Bibliography 291
  • Index 296
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.