Kath Williams: The Unions and the Fight for Equal Pay

By Zelda D’Aprano | Go to book overview
Contents
Acknowledgementsx
Forewordxiii
Abbreviationsxiv
Prefacexvii
1Cath the housewife/mother becomes Kath the activist1
2An early history of women and unionism21
3Women’s postwar moves on equal pay and the ACTU51
4Decisions on equal pay, 1891 to 195574
5The fight for equal pay, 1956 to 1959100
61960 to 1962, the fight escalates120
7Kath resigns from the Communist Party of Australia145
81963 to 1964, the ACTU and equal pay148
91965 to 1967, the ACTU gears up for action as Kath begins to retire169
10The ACTU changes policy: from urging legislation to preparing a claim for equal pay181
11The Equal Pay Case of 1969197
12Equal pay for work of equal value205
13Kath and male structures216
14Women, work and the fight for pay justice223
Table 1 Three important concepts185
Appendix 1 Noteworthy decisions on pay248
Appendix 2 The Victorian Working Women’s Centre253
Interviews257
Notes259
Bibliography278
Index286

-ix-

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