Texas State Parks and the CCC: The Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps

By Cynthia Brandimarte; Angela Reed | Go to book overview

Preserving the Legacy

That’s the wonderful thing about a park; it can be many things to you, it can be anything you
want it to be and you don’t need to think about the depth of who built this, made this road,
built that chimney behind us, but the more you learn about it the more it means to you, the
more it becomes part of your own birthright, your legacy, the more you want to go to the next
one to see what they did there, too
.—JIM STEELY1

As 1983 approached, the NPS, many state park systems, CCC alumni groups, and others prepared to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Becoming officially “historic” at fifty, according to criteria of the National Register of Historic Places, the buildings, features, and landscapes of CCC parks became objects of scholars’ studies, stewards’ enthusiasm, and alumni celebration. During the quarter century since the anniversary, the CCC parks have continued to garner attention, appreciation, renovation, and, of course, wear and tear.

Celebrations of the fiftieth anniversary in 1983 took many forms. Stewards of the national CCC parks produced brochures and pamphlets; organizations to reunite enrollees sprang up or strengthened; at reunions, celebrants swapped stories and shared treasured photographs and artifacts of camp life; they returned home to write reminiscences.

Aware of what this anniversary meant for TPWD’s historic properties, a core group of Texas historians and architects launched the first inventory of them. Historic preservationists, professionals employed by TPWD to implement the National Preservation Act of 1966, formed the agency’s Historic Sites and Restoration Branch. In 1983, historian Sue Moss directed an initial inventory of CCC parks, and architect Sarah Boykin catalogued each park’s features. “Although our group focused on parks acquired for their historical significance,” Moss recalls, “we all thought about the NPS architects and the CCC builders—now that is the kind of park planning we want to do—planning that will last!”2 ¾ey also set out to analyze the nuts and bolts of CCC buildings to ensure preservation of each park’s original design.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Texas State Parks and the CCC: The Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Fore Word ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • The CCC Creates a Texas State Parks System 3
  • Building CCC Parks in Texas 29
  • The CCC Legacy’s First Half Century 59
  • Preserving the Legacy 87
  • Epilogue - Inferno at Bastrop on Labor Day Weekend~° ˛˛ 109
  • Park Profiles 121
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliogr Aphy 157
  • Index 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.