Blueprints for Battle: Planning for War in Central Europe, 1948-1968

By Jan Hofeenaar; Dieter Krüdcger et al. | Go to book overview

8
Soviet Union Military
Planning, 1948–1968

Viktor Gavrilov


1948–1953

Immediately after World War II the 12-million-man Soviet army was reduced to a strength of 2.8 million. The most capable forces at the time were concentrated in the occupation zones in Germany, Austria, and Hungary. Along with the reconstruction of the Soviet economy, more attention was paid to the military. Within seven to eight years following the end of the war the Soviet armed forces were reequipped with advanced automatic rifles, artillery systems, engineering equipment, radar systems, and other modern types of weapons and arms. The “Uranium Project” had been successfully completed. New and intensive research was conducted in the area of missile weapons. Great attention was paid to the modernization of battle tanks and aviation. The Soviet Ground Forces (Army) were completely motorized and mechanized. The development of doctrine on the use of mobile troops and aviation received further attention. Strategic offensive was considered the primary form of operations, which intended to reach successively intermediate strategic objectives through the coordinated actions of all services and branches of the armed forces.

This key element of Soviet military doctrine of that time was well known in the West, although it had not yet been published. Western planners also knew that according to the Soviet doctrine, the primary forms of strategic offensive operations were envelopment and the destruction of the enemy forces. Unlike Washington, whose favored approach placed the priority on the

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Blueprints for Battle: Planning for War in Central Europe, 1948-1968
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.