made until September 24 to a dinner given by the International Teamsters' Union dominated by Daniel Tobin--an AFL union. Its purpose was to put some emphasis on the support of the AFL in view of the bitter feeling among AFL leaders because of the dominant role Sidney Hillman's CIO was playing in Roosevelt's councils and particularly in its favored position before Roosevelt's Labor Board. In October he made a speech before the Foreign Policy Association in New York and drove around the city in a rain storm to exhibit his robust health. Then he went on to Boston, making two or three short talks on the way. There is no point here in describing the course of that campaign. He interrupted it for an occasion of far more importance to our story. In September he went to another one of those international conferences, this time at Quebec.


11
How Germany's Fate Was Settled

ON SEPTEMBER 11, TEN MONTHS AFTER TEHERAN AND IN THE midst of the campaign, Roosevelt and Churchill met at Quebec. The invasion of France was launched. Allied armies approached the Rhine. The Russians had crossed the Vistula and were diving toward the Baltic and soon the race would be on between the Allies and the Russians for Berlin. Roosevelt and Churchill met to discuss the fate of Germany, lend-lease to Britain after the war and minor points. They made a decision at Quebec which has up to this moment paralyzed utterly the making of a stable peace in Europe and is pregnant with consequences so terrible for the future that the mind draws away from them in consternation. That decision produced what Secretary Stimson describes as "the most violent single

-379-

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The Roosevelt Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Book One 1
  • 1 - The New Dealer Takes the Deck 3
  • 4 - The New New Deal 33
  • 7 - An Enemy is Welcomed 77
  • Book Two 95
  • 1 97
  • 2 - War an the Courts 105
  • 5 - The Dame of the Philosopers 128
  • 7 - The Third Term 175
  • 10 - Henry Wallace 203
  • Book Three 231
  • A New Show Opens 233
  • 2 235
  • 3 258
  • 4 287
  • 5 299
  • 7 310
  • 8 - The Thought Police 320
  • 10 - Politics, Disease and History 331
  • 12 379
  • 13 387
  • 15 413
  • Reference 420
  • Bibliography 426
  • Index 430
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