13
The Final Betrayal

ON JANUARY 20, 1945, ROOSEVELT WAS SWORN IN AS PRESIDENT of the United States for a fourth term. Three days later he left Norfolk on the heavy cruiser Quincy for what was to be his last act in the hapless drama of peace.

By this time Hitler's hard-pressed armies had been driven from all the territories they had seized in the east, save Czechoslovakia, Austria and part of Hungary. Practically all their hard-won aggressive prizes were lost. Cordell Hull had resigned and Edward Stettinius was Secretary of State.

Roosevelt had named former Justice James F. Byrnes as Director of Economic Stabilization in May. He took Byrnes along to Yalta as his adviser. The trip to this rendezvous throws a revealing light on the methods which characterized Roosevelt's costly improvisations in foreign affairs. He asked Byrnes to accompany him some time before Christmas. He did not mention the subject again until the night before his departure, when he repeated his insistent invitation that Byrnes go with him. Secretary Stettinius was to join them in Malta. Hopkins, who was ill in London, would also meet the party at Malta. On the journey over Roosevelt was ill. He kept to his room all the way save for lunch and dinner and a moving picture at night. He did not discuss the conference problems with Byrnes before leaving and on the way over his other advisers were not along and he avoided discussion with Byrnes. The Department of State had prepared an elaborate study of all the problems likely to arise, extensively documented. Byrnes did not learn of its existence until he arrived at Malta.101 It is difficult to believe that a responsible

-387-

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The Roosevelt Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Book One 1
  • 1 - The New Dealer Takes the Deck 3
  • 4 - The New New Deal 33
  • 7 - An Enemy is Welcomed 77
  • Book Two 95
  • 1 97
  • 2 - War an the Courts 105
  • 5 - The Dame of the Philosopers 128
  • 7 - The Third Term 175
  • 10 - Henry Wallace 203
  • Book Three 231
  • A New Show Opens 233
  • 2 235
  • 3 258
  • 4 287
  • 5 299
  • 7 310
  • 8 - The Thought Police 320
  • 10 - Politics, Disease and History 331
  • 12 379
  • 13 387
  • 15 413
  • Reference 420
  • Bibliography 426
  • Index 430
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