Thomas Ince: Hollywood's Independent Pioneer

By Brian Taves | Go to book overview

Epilogue

Upon Thomas Ince’s death on November 19, 1924, the studio shut down only briefly, to ensure that employees would not suffer from being thrown out of work.1 However, by the end of November, eighty-five employees had been laid off.2 No new movies were started, but several were still shooting or in the editing phase, and contracts required their delivery.3 His wife, Elinor, quickly took an active part in the company’s direction.

Because I was familiar with Mr. Ince’s ideas and ideals I perhaps
best understood his wishes….I am going to co-operate with
the executives at the studio to carry out the present program of
production. Beyond that we have not made our plans.

For the present, I feel that it will prove the greatest help to me
to bear up under my personal sorrow, if I will be helpful in the
work my husband loved.4

He had often praised her selection of stories and advice on production and editing.5 As the family had grown, she had stepped back from the early involvement with the company, which had left him increasingly burdened and without the desired time to be with their sons.6 However, she continued to be known as a woman of keen and sound judgment and literary attainments, and the last reorganization had elevated her presence in the corporation.7

Colvin Brown, operating from his office in New York City, revealed what happened to J. Parker Read, who was in France at the time.

Immediately after the tragedy a decision was made through con-
ference between Mrs. Ince and Mr. [Ingle] Carpenter, who are

-271-

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Thomas Ince: Hollywood's Independent Pioneer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Screen Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Beginnings, 1880–1912 15
  • 1 - Stage Apprenticeship 17
  • 2 - Starting in Films 23
  • Part 2 - Making a Reputation, 1912–1915 39
  • 3 - The Job of a Producer 41
  • 4 - Establishing a Studio 53
  • Part 3 - Innovations, 1914–1917 73
  • 5 - Generic Experimentation 75
  • 6 - The Prescient Failure 89
  • Part 4 - Paramount, 1917–1921 109
  • 7 - A Fresh Start 111
  • 8 - The Star Series 119
  • 9 - World War I and Specials 143
  • Part 5 - The Perils of An Independent, 1919–1924 159
  • 10 - Associated Producers, 1919–1921 161
  • 11 - The Inevitable Merger, 1921–1922 177
  • 12 - War with First National, 1922 189
  • 13 - The Studio Resumes Production, 1922–1923 199
  • 14 - Case Study of a Production and Its Personnel- Her Reputation, 1922–1923 211
  • 15 - Initial Distribution beyond First National, 1923 231
  • 16 - At the Crossroads, 1923–1924 247
  • 17 - The Steady Hum of Independent Production, 1924 255
  • Epilogue 271
  • Notes 283
  • Bibliography 343
  • Index 355
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