The World and Africa: An Inquiry into the Part Which Africa Has Played in World History

By W. E. B. Du Bois | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
THE WHITE MASTERS OF THE WORLD

This is an attempt to show briefly what the domi-
nation of Europe over the world has meant to
mankind and especially to Africans in the nine-
teenth and twentieth centuries
.

WHAT are the real causes back of the collapse of Europe in the twentieth century? What was the real European imperialism pictured in the Paris Exposition of 1900? France did not stand purely for art. There was much imitation, convention, suppression, and sale of genius; and France wanted wealth and power at any price. Germany did not stand solely for science. I remember when the German professor at whose home I was staying in 1890 expressed his contempt for the rising businessmen. He had heard them conversing as he drank in a Bierstube at Eisenach beneath the shade of Luther’s Wartburg. Their conversation, he sneered, was lauter Geschaft! He did not realize that a new Germany was rising which wanted German science for one main purpose—wealth and power. America wanted freedom, but freedom to get rich by any method short of anarchy; and freedom to get rid of the democracy which allowed laborers to dictate to managers and investors.

All these centers of civilization envied England the wealth and power built upon her imperial colonial system. One looking at European imperialism in 1900 therefore should have looked

-16-

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The World and Africa: An Inquiry into the Part Which Africa Has Played in World History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Chapter I - The Collapse of Europe 1
  • Chapter II - The White Masters of the World 16
  • Chapter III - The Rape of Africa 44
  • Chapter IV - The Peopling of Africa 81
  • Chapter V - Egypt 98
  • Chapter VI - The Land of the Burnt Faces 115
  • Chapter VII - Atlantis 148
  • Chapter VIII - Central Africa and the March of the Bantu 164
  • Chapter IX - Asia in Africa 176
  • Chapter X - The Black Sudan 201
  • Chapter XI - Andromeda 226
  • The Message 261
  • Index 263
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