Englightenment or Empire: Colonial Discourse in German Culture

By Russell A. Berman | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

‘The Kilimanjaro is German; it is a German mountain and, what’s more, the tallest one in the German Reich. Eternal snow lies on none of our mountains at home—but it covers the summit of our newly won peak, only three degrees south of the equator!”1 Such glowing pride in ownership comes from one C. Falkenhorst, an anthologizer and popularizer of the literature of travel and discovery at the end of the nineteenth century. His volumes bear stirring tides such as Auf Bergeshöhen Deutsch-Afrikas (On the mountain peaks of German Africa) or Durch the Wüsten und Steppen des dunklen Weltteils (Through the deserts and steppes of the dark continent). Published within a series called Bibliothek denkwürdiger Forschungsreisen (The library of remarkable explorations), the books include Falkenhorst’s descriptions of various expeditions, which he embellished by cutting and pasting from the reports of the travelers themselves. Robert Flegel, Oskar Lenz, Gustav Nachtigal, Alexandrine von Tinne, Hugo Zoeller, and other Afrikareisende, to use the contemporary term, are heroized, excerpted, and presented to a mass reading public, who consume a literature poised ambiguously between popular science and colonial advocacy. Whatever else colonialism may have entailed, it appeared to the reading public as a voyage into an uncharted space, the reports on which could be judged as edifying and instructive, just as they were indisputably thrilling: learn and enjoy.

But let us leave science aside for a moment (although it will concern us often in this book) and return to that hybrid image of the German Kilimanjaro, part European, part African, a mixed-race geography. When Falkenhorst speaks of “our African Alps,” we might shrug it off as an innocently descriptive designation of an “alpine region” (as in the alpine meadows of the Sierra) or perhaps an example of the proliferating alpine metaphor, as when one speaks of the “Saxonian Switzerland” in central Germany or even the “Trinity Alps” in northern California. These overly cautious readings

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Englightenment or Empire: Colonial Discourse in German Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- The Enlightenment Travelogue and the Colonial Text 21
  • 2- Gerhard Rohlfs and Geographic Writing 65
  • 3- Henry Stern and Missionary Space 104
  • 4- Engendered Colonies 134
  • 5- Colonial Literature and the Emancipation of Women 171
  • 6- The Myth of Anticolonialism 203
  • Notes 241
  • Selected Bibliography 249
  • Index 259
  • In the Modem German Culture and Literature Series 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.