The Southeastern Ceremonial Complex: Artifacts and Analysis: The Cottonlandia Conference

By Patricia Galloway | Go to book overview

Notes

1. “CEREMONIAL—adj. Of or pertaining to ceremony, ritual, formal. noun 1. A system of rules of ceremony; ritual, also social etiquette.

2. A ceremony. CEREMONY—noun 1. A formal or symbolic act or observance or a series of them as on religious and state occasions; the doing of some formal act in the manner prescribed by authority or usage; hence also, mere outward form. 2. Observance of etiquette or conventional forms of social matters; formal civility; adherence to the prescribed forms of amenity.

CULT—noun 1. Worship or religious devotion; especially, a form of religion. 2. A system of religious observances. 3. Extravagant devotion to a person, cause, or thing; also, the object of such devotion. [F. culte L. cultus, colo, worship]

EXTRAVAGANT—adj. 1. Exceeding ordinary limits; excessive; especially needlessly free or lavish in expenditure. 2. Immoderate, fantastic, unrestrained” (Britannica Word Language New Practical Standard Dictionary, ed. Robert C. Preble [New York: Funk and Wagnails, 1954]).

2. Howard has clearly documented the validity of this contention. Equating cults with secrecy, Howard still opted for the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex as an expression of “cultural vitality” as well as a “messianic” or revitalization movement, albeit “one wholly pre-Columbian” (1968:7). Then he demonstrated in great detail that in those cases where any concrete historical behavioral data existed, the complex was in part post-Columbian, even post-Columbian Exposition; it was secretive in many ideological and behavioral aspects (64–73); it appeared to have significant revitalization overtones, intimately tied to agricultural productivity (27–119), which was in many cases reflected in ritualized socially dyadic behavior of a ranked and competitive nature, complete with complementary spatial and structural appurtenances (99 ff.). My interpretation of these data suggests that by the late nineteenth century (if not somewhat earlier) the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex had indeed become little more than a nativistic cult.

3. It may be worth pointing out that the most elaborate archaeological evidence for individual status differentiation is to be found during the Moorehead phase at Cahokia, earlier than and north of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex apogee in its heartland (Fowler 1969, 1978; Fowler and Hall 1978). I have too little familiarity with whatever regional social and economic patterns must have articulated with the Spiro mortuary manifestation. Problems of ethnohistorical structural retrodiction have hampered even the best efforts in this area (Wyckoff and Baugh 1980; Brown, Bell, and Wyckoff 1978). Given that the scattered population and quasiPlains adaptation of the Hasinai was a predictable demographic result after four hundred years of increasing cold and aridity, it is difficult to avoid the speculation that in the general Caddoan area, the interlocking hierarchical social structure inferred for the Spiro phase (Brown 1975, 1976b) was gone long before A. D. 1492, victim more of the changing climate of the fourteenth century than of the charging conquistador of the sixteenth. This was, of course, true of Cahokia as well.

4. Certainly Brown’s second point, which makes Tecumseh’s brother

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Southeastern Ceremonial Complex: Artifacts and Analysis: The Cottonlandia Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 391

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.