Dreaming Frankenstein & Collected Poems, 1967-1984

By Liz Lochhead | Go to book overview

Getting Back

I was to ring you, remember,
the minute I got back. (Your number
among all those American addresses that came since.)
I look
it up where you wrote it, something special in my book.
Four months. Four thousand miles apart and more.
Keeping in touch
with us both on the move and all, no fixed addresses,
was too much
to ask of us. From the Acropolis to the Empire State
it’s a far cry. Then, between San Francisco and
Istanbul, late
August burned and the distance grew.
That close and now at odds. You
had done with the sun by the time I got round to it.
You woke up, I sank into sleep, worlds away. We moved
in opposite
directions in the dark about each other’s days.
Now, I only lift the telephone and the operator says
she’s trying to connect us. Between us four miles,
no distance,
it’s a local call – I should get through for sixpence.

But I just got back. No small change. I forgot
to check on it. I push a quarter in the shilling slot,
pips stop (my heartbeat), you reply to my
small and civic dishonesty.
I jingle my pocket – nickles, dimes,
meaningless currency -
and try to picture you at the receiving end – moustache
at the mouth-piece
unless you’ve changed a lot. I take a breath
‘And how was Greece?’
We namedrop cities into silences, feel the distance grow
find no common ground to get back to. I know
in my bones, nothing’s the same anymore.
Don’t you remember the girl I’m a dead ringer for?

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dreaming Frankenstein & Collected Poems, 1967-1984
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Dreaming Frankenstein (1984) 1
  • What the Pool Said, on Midsummer’s Day 3
  • An Abortion 5
  • Smuggler 12
  • Page from a Biography 13
  • The People’s Poet 14
  • Construction for a Site- Library on An Old Croquet Lawn, St Andrews Nine Approaches 17
  • Fourth of July Fireworks 20
  • The Carnival Horses 23
  • Ontario October Going West 24
  • Near Qu’Appelle 25
  • In Alberta 26
  • Ships 34
  • Hafiz on Danforth Avenue 36
  • A Gift 39
  • Reading the Signs 40
  • Flitting 41
  • A Giveaway 43
  • Heartbreak Hotel 45
  • China Song 47
  • Why I Gave You the Chinese Plate 48
  • Old Notebooks 49
  • Fin 51
  • That Summer 52
  • West Kensington 53
  • The Empty Song 54
  • Noises in the Dark 55
  • A Letter 56
  • Sundaysong 57
  • The Legend of the Sword & The Stone 58
  • Rainbow 59
  • The Dollhouse Convention 61
  • In the Dreamschool 62
  • The Offering 65
  • Legendary 67
  • Fetch on the First of January 72
  • Mirror’s Song 74
  • The Grimm Sisters (1981) 77
  • The Storyteller Poems 79
  • The Grim Sisters 82
  • The Furies 84
  • My Rival’s House 87
  • Three Twists 89
  • Tam Lin’s Lady 93
  • Six Disenchantments 96
  • Part Two- The Beltane Bride 98
  • Song of Solomon 99
  • Stooge Song 100
  • Midsummer Night 102
  • Blueshirt 104
  • The Hickie 105
  • The Other Woman 106
  • Last Supper 107
  • Part Three- Hags and Maidens 109
  • The Ariadne Version 111
  • Poem for My Sister 113
  • My Mother’s Suitors 114
  • Girl’s Song 116
  • The Cailleach 117
  • Poppies 118
  • The Last Hag 120
  • Islands (1978) 123
  • Outer 125
  • Inner 132
  • Laundrette 136
  • The Bargain 138
  • In the Francis Bacon Room at the Tate 142
  • Memo for Spring (1972) 145
  • Revelation 147
  • Poem for Other Poor Fools 148
  • How Have I Been 149
  • On Midsummer Common 150
  • Fragmentary 152
  • The Visit 153
  • After a Warrant Sale 154
  • Phoenix 156
  • Daft Annie on Our Village Mainstreet 157
  • Obituary 159
  • Morning after 161
  • Inventory 162
  • Grandfather’s Room 163
  • For My Grandmother Knitting 165
  • Something I’m Not 167
  • Poem on a Day Trip 168
  • Overheard by a Young Waitress 169
  • Notes on the Inadequacy of a Sketch 170
  • Letter from New England 172
  • Getting Back 175
  • Box Room 176
  • Song for Coming Home 178
  • George Square 179
  • Man on a Bench 181
  • Carnival 182
  • Cloakroom 184
  • The Choosing 185
  • Homilies from Hospital 187
  • Object 190
  • Wedding March 192
  • Riddle-Me-Ree 193
  • Memo to Myself for Spring 194
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 195

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.