Who Gets What: Fair Compensation after Tragedy and Financial Upheaval

By Kenneth R. Feinberg | Go to book overview

1
THE PROFESSOR, THE JUDGE, THE LAWYER, AND THE SENATOR

Life rarely works out as planned, for reasons that are varied and often unpredictable. A lost opportunity for professional advancement turns out to be a blessing in disguise. Illness, personal relationships, family squabbles, financial considerations, changing priorities—all lead us to the road not taken.

I never anticipated a legal career spent attempting to mend the damage wrought by public tragedies. If terrorists had not struck the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, if a deranged gunman had not fired at random at Virginia Tech, if an oil rig had not exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, if the nation had not been forced to confront the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, I would have spent my career mediating and negotiating disputes without public scrutiny. Content with my law practice, hopefully achieving the respect and admiration of my colleagues, family, and friends, I would have sought financial success while achieving some

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Who Gets What: Fair Compensation after Tragedy and Financial Upheaval
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - The Professor, the Judge, the Lawyer, and the Senator 1
  • 2 - Agent Orange 23
  • 3 - The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund 41
  • 4 - The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund 63
  • 5 - Payingwall Street Executives 85
  • 6 - Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 125
  • Epilogue 185
  • Appendix 201
  • Index 205
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