Difficult Diasporas: The Transnational Feminist Aesthetic of the Black Atlantic

By Samantha Pinto | Go to book overview

3/The Drama of Dislocation: Staging
Diaspora History in the Work of
Adrienne Kennedy and Ama Ata Aidoo

The reality of the African continent and of its varied peoples is made
to conform to a lawlikely prescribed pattern. What is more, it is made
to do so both before political independence and after political indepen-
dence,… both during the colonial era and after the colonial era. Can we
therefore speak here… of merely a colonial rationale as the causal factor
which determines the lawlike production of these representations?… Not
even we ourselves, as African and black diaspora critics… can, in the
normal course of things, be entirely freed from the functioning of these
rules; and therefore, from knowing and representing the “cultural universe
of Africa” through the same western “gallery of mirrors” which deforms—
even where this deformation is effected in the most radically oppositional
terms which seek to challenge rather than to reinforce the deformation
.

SYLVIA WYNTER, “Africa, the West and the Analogy of Culture:
The Cinematic Text after Man” (citing V. Y. Mudimbe’s
The Invention of Africa)

In 2007, Ama Ata Aidoo’s play The Dilemma of a Ghost was staged in London’s Africa Centre, in association with the National Theatre Company of Ghana, as a commemoration of the fiftieth year since Ghana’s independence, and the two hundredth anniversary of Britain’s abolition of the slave trade.1 The drama seems an unlikely choice for inclusion in a national memorial that typically stages historical and political scenes in their most obvious sense; the most direct reference to the slave trade in the play is limited to a few offhand comments about the central African American character’s ancestry and a recurrent song emphasizing former slave-trading posts in Ghana, and it also manages to stay far away from Accra politics. The production, cast with a mix of Ghanaian and Black British actors in a custom-remodeled theatrical space, focuses on the relations of the present rather than the past. As the director of the 2007

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Difficult Diasporas: The Transnational Feminist Aesthetic of the Black Atlantic
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.