Family, Marriage, and Parenthood

By Howard Becker; Reuben Hill | Go to book overview

Appendix

Marriage Prediction Scale

ERNEST W. BURGESS AND LEONARD S. COTTRELL

DIRECTIONS: The man should read the part headed "Items for Prospective Husbands," mark his own score on each item, and add these figures together. For example, if he was the youngest of several children, this counts 15 toward the final score; but if he was an only child, his mark will be zero on this item. Similarly, the prospective bride marks her rating on each item under the heading "Items for Prospective Wives" and adds these figures to give her individual score. Then together the couple should answer the questions under the heading "Items Common to Both Husband and Wife," marking their rating on each. Adding the three totals -- husband's score, wife's score, and items common to both -- will give the "marriage prediction score." If this is above 700, there is a 98 per cent chance that the couple will be extremely happy. If between 540 and 700, there is a strong probability that they will be above average in happiness. But if the "prediction score" is below 300, the chances of unhappiness are almost 100 per cent.

SCORE
I.ITEMS FOR PROSPECTIVE HUSBANDS
1.Your place in your family:
Am only child0
Am oldest child15
Am middle child20
Am youngest child15
No reply0
2.Most attached to which brother or sister:
Only child0
No special attachment but have brother or sister20
Most attached to older brother20
Most attached to older sister10
Most attached to younger brother15
Most attached to younger sister15
No reply0
3.Area of residence:
City:* rooming-house area0
City:* area of "first settlement"15
City:* area of "second settlement" (newer neighborhoods)20
City:* hotel area0
City:* apartment and apartment hotel10
City:* private homes of better class20
City:* suburbs30
Other city or town: above 10,00010
Small town (not city* suburb): below 10,00020
Used by permission of Prentice-Hall, Inc., publishers of Predicting Success or Failure in Marriage ( New York, 1939).
*200,000 population or over.

-807-

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