Living with Brain Injury: Narrative, Community, and Women's Renegotiation of Identity

By J. Eric Stewart | Go to book overview

Introduction

Nancy: And this is so funny, constantly doctors were asking me,
“Tell me what this means: People who live in glass houses shouldn’t
throw stones.” Constantly! They were giving me these little phrases
and asking me what they mean: “Tell me what this means. Tell me
what this means.” You know? Those are hard. Those are hard to deal
with.

When Nancy was in her late twenties she began having blinding headaches, tunnel vision, and dizziness, which led to a diagnosis of a congenital arterial malformation on her brain stem. Surgery was scheduled and she wrapped projects at her job as a financial consultant, assuming she would be back at work in three weeks. The first surgery was unsuccessful, and complications during a second surgery caused serious damage to the right side of her brain, resulting in partial paralysis of the left side of her body and memory and cognitive problems: “I woke up and there were all these deficits and I was really blown away by it. I was pretty severely depressed about it.” Although she was constantly evaluated in various ways, Nancy’s own questions and her distress got little attention in the hospital; it took a suicide threat to obtain acknowledgment and help for her depression. Her cognitive impairments remitted

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Living with Brain Injury: Narrative, Community, and Women's Renegotiation of Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - People and Methodology 25
  • 2 - Meeting Post-Injury 52
  • 3 - Oneself as Another 82
  • 4 - Fighting 98
  • 5 - Sense (and Sensibility) of Community 137
  • 6 - Wrestling with An Angel 175
  • Coda 216
  • Appendix - Brief Summary of Participants’ Demographics and Injuries 225
  • References 227
  • Index 239
  • About the Author 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 247

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.