On the Poems of Henry Vaughan: Characteristics and Intimations

By Edmund Blunden | Go to book overview

will naturally arise to know something respecting the Author"; and as it was nearly two centuries since anything of importance had been printed by or about Vaughan, this was no idle presumption. The seventeenth-century country doctor, however, had not suffered by the long period of inanition. The present day sees him as a standard author, or very nearly; besides a number of small reprints, he has been splendidly produced in 1896, in 1915, and again in 1924. The reverence and love which many feel towards him in this late age have been perfectly expressed in a sonnet, "At the Grave of Henry Vaughan," printed without the author's name in the London Mercury, and generally recognised as Mr. Sassoon's.

Without any profound interest in reputation after death--and in his life he seems to have desired at most the simple rewards of a worthy doctor--Vaughan gives us to feel that he was aware of his chances in the eventual history of Britain. He never lifts up his voice in imitation of the Horatian or Ovidian trumpet-call, claiming monuments more solid than bronze and one half of round eternity; but his natural quietness is deeply impressive as he addresses his serious intimacies "Ad Posteros". Since

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On the Poems of Henry Vaughan: Characteristics and Intimations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • To the Reader 5
  • On the Poems of Henry Vaughan 7
  • Note on the Use of Italics In "Silex Scintillans" 50
  • Marginalia to Some of the Poems 53
  • Translations From Vaughan's Latin 57
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