Juvenile Courts in the United States

By Herbert H. Lou | Go to book overview

Appendix II
A STANDARD JUVENILE-COURT LAW1 AN ACT TO ESTABLISH JUVENILE COURTS, DEFINING THEIR JURISDICTION, POWERS AND DUTIES, AND REGULATING PROCEDURE THEREIN

ARTICLE I--ESTABLISHMENT; JURISDICTION

Section 1. Purpose and basic principle. The purpose of this act is to secure for each child under its jurisdiction such care, guidance and control, preferably in his own home, as will conduce to the child's welfare and the best interests of the state; and when such child is removed from his own family, to secure for him custody, care and discipline as nearly as possible equivalent to that which should have been given by his parents.

The principle is hereby recognized that children under the jurisdiction of the court are wards of the state, subject to the discipline and entitled to the protection of the state, which may intervene to safeguard them from neglect or injury and to enforce the legal obligations due to them and from them.

Sec. 2. Construction of the act. This act shall be liberally construed to accomplish the purpose herein sought.

Sec. 3. Definitions. 1. Whenever the words "the court" are used in this act, they mean the juvenile court2 established by this act.

____________________
1
Prepared by the Committee on Standard Juvenile Court Laws Appointed by the National Probation Association, May, 1923, to prepare an act to conform in general with the "Juvenile-Court Standards." Adopted by the annual conference of the Association held in Denver in June, 1995.

The Committee on Standard Juvenile Court Laws consisted of Judge Franklin Chase Hoyt (Chairman), Judge Mary M. Bartelme, Judge Frederick P. Cabot, Bernard Flexner, Judge Charles W. Hoffman, Judge Henry S. Hulbert, Judge James Hoge Ricks, Dr. Miriam Van Waters, Judge Edward F. Waite and Charles L. Chute ( Secretary).

Courtesy of the National Probation Association.

2
Or the court may be designated throughout the act as "The Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court," "The Juvenile and Family Court," "The Domestic Relations Court," or "The Family Court."

-232-

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