Bodily Charm: Living Opera

By Linda Hutcheon; Michael Hutcheon | Go to book overview

Notes

Before We Begin … An Introductory Note

1. Brooks, Body Work, xi.

2. Starobinski, [The Natural and Literary History of Bodily Sensation,] 353.

3. Elizabeth Grosz believes that the fascination with the body in the 1980s, while [presenting itself as a celebration of the body and its pleasures, … bears witness to a profound, if unacknowledged and undiscussed, hatred and resentment of the body] (Space, Time, and Perversion, 1).

4. See Phelan, Mourning Sex (1997) on the [catastrophe and exhilaration of embodiment,] including trauma (2). The pleasurable discourse continued into the nineties too, however. See Frueh, Erotic Faculties (1996). In this section, we will include dates of publication to signal the timing of the issues raised.

5. See, for example, Dollimore, Sexual Dissidence (1991). Caroline By– num's comment comes in her important survey of body criticism and her critique of the essentializing that goes on in this work when everyone from Plato to Descartes and onward is labeled as dualist and misogynist ([Why All the Fuss,] 5).

6. Eagleton, The Illusions of Postmodernism, 69.

7. Foucault, An Introduction, 12.

8. Feher, Naddaff, and Tazi, eds., Fragments (1989).

9. Examples of collaborative work: in order to challenge the Cartesian dualism of mind and body, psychologists and philosophers work together to see how the body is integral to certain aspects of self– consciousness (see Eilan, Marcel, and Bermúdez, [Self-Consciousness and the Body,] 1); literary and film theorists, postcolonial commenta– tors, and queer and feminist critics collaborate in an attempt to [re– think, to reconceptualize, explore, disentangle or recomplicate sexual

-207-

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Bodily Charm: Living Opera
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Bodily Charm i
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Before We Begin … - An Introductory Note on the Operatic Body in Context xiii
  • Prelude - Restoring Opera''s Bodies 1
  • Act1 - Represented Bodies 37
  • 1 - The Body Beautiful 41
  • 2 - The Body Dangerous 85
  • Act 2 - Real Bodies 113
  • 3 - The Performing Body 117
  • 4 - The Perceiving Body 153
  • Postlude - Atoast to Opera''s Bodies 183
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 293
  • Index 341
  • Lincoin Lecture Series 348
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