Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

By Jeremy G. Carter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Organizational Influences on Police
Change and Intelligence

ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORKS FOR POLICING

A variety of organizational theories have been applied to policing environments. For purposes of this study only the most salient theoretical frameworks featured in the research literature will be discussed in the context of law enforcement intelligence practices.


Systems Perspectives and Policing

Traditional law enforcement perspectives deal with stabilizing immediate problems rather than attempting to analyze comprehensively each situation and determine the best course of action so that problems resulting from the “quick fix” attitude do not arise anew (Carter, 2002). In contrast, a systems thinking organization would stabilize the immediate problem and call upon support organizations to aid in the permanent solution to the problem. In the current context of intelligence-led policing, the solution of problems pertains to the ability of intelligence-driven operations to prevent or mitigate threats and crime. Systems theories offer new philosophies for analysis and actions which can be implemented within any existing community policing-practicing organization given the aforementioned similarities between ILP and COP.

Systems perspectives emphasize the importance of cohesiveness and interdependency within organizational structures and communities (Aldrich & Ruef, 2006; Boland & Tenkasi, 1995). When members of a team share common visions and goals, they work together as a part of a process to achieve positive results through commitment rather than compliance. Often this co-active process can require a difficult transition for individuals adverse to change - as is the case with “old school” police executives who have yet to accept ILP or refuse to do so. Systems perspectives encourage members to examine how one’s own actions influence others, and include learning to recognize the ramifications and tradeoffs of chosen actions.

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